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A(gender): An Anthology

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A(gender): An Anthology

Submit your work for inclusion in A(gender): An Anthology, a journal issue amplifying the writing and art of agender people on the theme of gender. Deadline: August 1st, 2018.

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Vol. 2, Issue 1: On Asexuality and Sex

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Vol. 2, Issue 1: On Asexuality and Sex

Asexuality and Sex

Asexuality is frequently conflated with being nonsexual, that is, not relating to sex in any manner. Ace people are often perceived as possessing no relationship to sex except repulsion, yet this is a generalized assumption that does not reflect the entirety of the community. Ace people may or may not engage in sex, they may be sex-favorable, sex-neutral, or sex-repulsed. As an ace person, how do these perceptions of asexuality and sex relate to your own understandings of asexuality? What does sex mean to you as an ace/asexual person, if anything? Do you engage in sex? How do you navigate understandings of asexuality as being synonymous with being "nonsexual" as an ace/asexual person who engages in sex? Do you feel that there a sexual expectation placed upon you as an ace/asexual person that is difficult to fulfill? What are your thoughts on sex? Other related themes to explore in this issue are definitions of sexual attraction, romantic attraction, or other types of attraction, reproduction and asexuality, and sexualization of the body. 

Deadline: March 20th, 2018


WHAT TO SUBMIT:

On the above theme(s), The Asexual is currently accepting poetry, prose, fiction, nonfiction, personal essays, academic essays, abstract written pieces, and any other form of writing. The Asexual also accepts photography, recorded videos, music, speeches, recited poetry, sketches, drawings, paintings, comics, abstract artistic work, and any other form of visual and/or recorded media. 

Submissions can be under a pseudonym. Submissions can be in languages other than English.

FORMAT:

Poetry should be under 50 lines and all writing should be under 3,000 words (if you would like to submit a longer piece, please send an email to asexualjournal@gmail.com or a DM on Twitter prior to submission for confirmation). Please note that music or video submissions will not be included in the print edition of the journal. Instead, a link to these sources will be included in the print journal with your bio. You may also choose to include a description of the media.

If you are submitting written work, your submission should be in Microsoft Word or PDF format. If you are submitting images, your submission should be in .jpeg/.jpg, .png, .bmp, .gif, .tiff, or any widely-used image format. If you are submitting music or video, your submission should be in any widely-used audio or video format.

Also, you must include a short bio, 50-150 words written in 3rd person (this may include your location, how you identify, previous publications, education, any social media links or website links you would like to share, and more).

PUBLICATION:

  1. The Asexual aims to respond within 2 weeks if your submission has been accepted for publication.
  2. Your submission may undergo a short editing process. You have the choice for final approval.
  3. All publications are paid at the current rate of $2.5o for poems and $5.00 for essays/artwork/other, as per the most recently surpassed Patreon goal. Payments will be distributed electronically via Paypal following the publication of the issue online and in print. You may also choose to opt out of payment if you so wish.
  4. You retain copyright of your work upon publication.
  5. You agree to give The Asexual first serial/electronic and print rights, and electronic and print archival rights. You agree to allow your work to be published online and in print/physical release and to be promoted on any social media of The Asexual. You agree to allow your work to be available for download in PDF format and on the TheAsexual.com upon release for free as well as for purchase in physical format. You also agree that if the work is published subsequently, either online or in print, credit to The Asexual is provided.

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Vol. 1, Issue 4: On the Intersections of Race and Asexuality

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Vol. 1, Issue 4: On the Intersections of Race and Asexuality

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Asexuality and Race

According to a census of the ace community by AVEN in 2014, of over 10,000 ace people surveyed, 77.3% of respondents identified themselves as "White (NonHispanic)." Ace communities are highly dominated by white people and white voices. How does this impact understandings and perceptions of asexuality more generally? How does the relationship between whiteness and asexuality alter understandings of your own asexuality as an ace person? What is your experience as an ace person of color? How can the centrality of whiteness in the ace community be dismantled? Submissions are not limited to the discussion or questions posed here, this is simply one potential origination point on exploring this theme of race and asexuality more broadly. Other related themes to explore in this issue are transnational asexualities, especially in majority non-English-speaking countries, and the intersections of asexuality and ethnicity.

Deadline: January 20th, 2018


What to Submit:

On the above theme(s), The Asexual is currently accepting poetry, prose, fiction, nonfiction, personal essays, academic essays, abstract written pieces, and any other form of writing. The Asexual also accepts photography, recorded videos, music, speeches, recited poetry, sketches, drawings, paintings, comics, abstract artistic work, and any other form of visual and/or recorded media. 

Submissions can be under a pseudonym. Submissions can be in languages other than English.

Format:

Poetry should be under 50 lines and all writing should be under 3,000 words (if you would like to submit a longer piece, please send an email to asexualjournal@gmail.com or a DM on Twitter prior to submission for confirmation). Please note that music or video submissions will not be included in the print edition of the journal. Instead, a link to these sources will be included in the print journal with your bio. You may also choose to include a description of the media.

If you are submitting written work, your submission should be in Microsoft Word or PDF format. If you are submitting images, your submission should be in .jpeg/.jpg, .png, .bmp, .gif, .tiff, or any widely-used image format. If you are submitting music or video, your submission should be in any widely-used audio or video format.

Also, you must include a short bio, 50-150 words written in 3rd person (this may include your location, how you identify, previous publications, education, any social media links or website links you would like to share, and more).

Publication:

  1. The Asexual aims to respond within 2 weeks if your submission has been accepted for publication.
  2. Your submission may undergo a short editing process. You have the choice for final approval.
  3. All publications are paid at the current rate of $2.5o for poems and $5.00 for essays/artwork/other, as per the most recently surpassed Patreon goal. Payments will be distributed electronically via Paypal following the publication of the issue online and in print. You may also choose to opt out of payment if you so wish.
  4. You retain copyright of your work upon publication.
  5. You agree to give The Asexual first serial/electronic and print rights, and electronic and print archival rights. You agree to allow your work to be published online and in print/physical release and to be promoted on any social media of The Asexual. You agree to allow your work to be available for download in PDF format and on the TheAsexual.com upon release for free as well as for purchase in physical format. You also agree that if the work is published subsequently, either online or in print, credit to The Asexual is provided.

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VOTE: Proposed themes for Vol. 1, Issue 4 of The Asexual journal

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VOTE: Proposed themes for Vol. 1, Issue 4 of The Asexual journal

It's that time again to select a new theme for The Asexual's upcoming journal issue Vol. 1, Issue 4, the final in the volume one series as well as the final of 2017. Body, the theme for Vol. 1, Issue 3 was chosen via Twitter poll previously, receiving a plurality of votes, more than other proposed themes of Interspace, Symbolism, and Pride. Some of these proposed themes are back again, but the process of selection will be slightly more expansive than last time. Listed below are sixteen potential themes being proposed for future issues of The Asexual journal as well as a short description containing questions and topics concerning potential directions for discussion of the theme in the issue. Be sure to vote for the themes that you support as potential topics. The eight themes with the most votes will be included in two separate Twitter polls (of four each). Within each of these polls, the two themes that receive the most votes will advance to a final Twitter poll. The theme with the most votes in this final Twitter poll will decide the theme of the next issue. All of these themes intersect with a multiplicity of questions that have circulating in my thoughts concerning how asexuality societally functions, including how it is understood, perceived, portrayed, accessed, and expressed.

The questions included with each theme are only meant to spur an introductory discussion on each theme and are not required to be addressed and do not define the limitations of potential discussion regarding the theme in the issue.


Current Standings:

Until October 3rd - Deadline for preliminary voting. You will have until October 3rd to choose which of the 20 themes from above you wish to see as a future journal theme. The 8 themes with the most votes will advance to the next round.

Results

Attraction    18
Representation    17
Community    16
Pride    14
Gender    11
Intersectionality    11
Defining Asexuality    10
Race    10
Privilege    10
Sex    10

Disability    9
Health    9
Cyberspace    7
Nature    7
Masculinity    5
BDSM / Kink    3

Attraction, Representation, Community, Pride, Gender, and Intersectionality are determined to be moving to second-round voting. However, because of a 4-way tie, another poll will be created between the four choices of Defining Asexuality, Race, Privilege, and Sex, with the top 2 that receive the most votes also moving to the next round. This will be done on Twitter on October 4th. Topics with fewer votes from the entire list of topics will be considered for a special yearly issue of The Asexual journal that is currently being proposed as a Patreon goal.

Results of Tiebreaker (Poll) - 149 votes

  1. Sex - 31%
  2. Race - 25%
  3. Defining Asexuality - 24%
  4. Privilege - 20% 

Top 8

  • Attraction
  • Representation
  • Community
  • Pride
  • Gender
  • Intersectionality
  • Sex
  • Race

October 5th to the 6th - Deadline for second-round voting. These two polls containing the top 8 themes will be held on Twitter via @AsexualJournal (in order to increase the total votes and potential audience) from October 5th to the 6th. The top 2 from each will move on to the final round of voting to decide the journal theme for this issue.

Group 1 - October 5th (Poll) - 226 votes

  • Attraction - 52%
  • Race - 24%
  • Community - 12%
  • Intersectionality - 12%

Group 2 - October 6th (Poll) - 117 votes

  • Representation - 31%
  • Sex - 28%
  • Pride - 20%
  • Gender - 21%

October 7th - Final round. This poll will contain the top 4 most-voted themes, and will be open for voting on Twitter via @AsexualJournal (in order to increase the total votes and potential audience) on October 7th. On October 7th, the theme for Vol. 1, Issue 4 will be announced and submissions will open.

Final Four - October 7th (Poll) - 206 votes

  1. Race - 31% (Theme)
  2. Attraction - 25% (Tie)
  3. .Representation - 25% (Tie)
  4. Sex - 19%

Attraction

Many ace/asexual people often identify by how they experience non-sexual attraction, such as romantic, aesthetic, or sensual attraction. As an ace/asexual person, how do you identify in relation to attraction? How do you define attraction? What does it mean to you, as ace/asexual person, to experience non-sexual attraction? If you do experience attraction, how do you negotiate attraction to people who may be inside or outside the ace community? If you are aromantic, how do you navigate assumptions of romantic attraction as well as other types of attraction?

BDSM / Kink

As an ace person, do you engage in BDSM or are you kinky? If so, how does your involvement in the BDSM or kink community intersect with your asexuality? BDSM and kink are often perceived as explicitly sexual practices. Does your practice of BDSM or kink countered these perceptions? Should it? Does your involvement in BDSM or kink lead to sexual arousal? How do you navigate misunderstood or limited conceptions surrounding the relationship between ideas of sex, sexual arousal, and sexual attraction? What types of BDSM or kink do you engage in as an ace person?

Community

As an ace/asexual person, how do you define community? Do you feel connected to the ace community? Have you formed a community with other ace people for support (online or in-person)? Is community important to you? Do you find the ace community to be exclusionary? Has the ace community made you feel empowered? Do you feel as though you are accepted as ace/asexual person in the larger queer or LGBTQIA+ community? How do you navigate between multiple communities which may be perceived as in conflict with one another (such as being gay and asexual)?

Cyberspace

For many ace people, online spaces have been intrinsic in their process of discovering and embracing their asexuality. How have online spaces been important to you as an ace/asexual person? Has the internet operated as an effective tool to spread awareness and acceptance of asexuality? Have online connections led to in-person connections with other ace people in your life? Without the internet, how would you define your ace identity? Could you? 

Defining Asexuality

What is your definition of asexuality? Should definitions of asexuality be specific and limited or loose and expandable? Why? Is it important that a singular definition of asexuality be adopted entirely by the community? What does your definition of asexuality include and exclude? How does defining asexuality relate to identity management? Is someone only asexual if they self-identify as asexual?

Disability

Asexuality has been and is perceived by some as a disability. Disabled people have been perceived as asexual. Why does this relationship matter? Should the relationship between asexuality and disability be deconstructed or can it be constructive? What is your experience as a disabled asexual person? How do you navigate understandings of your asexuality and disability? How does asexuality inform understandings of disability and vice versa?

Gender

Are certain gender identities in conflict with asexuality more than others? How do you navigate your gender in relation to your asexuality? Do you feel excluded from the ace community or from identifying as ace because of your gender? How do understandings of gender complicate asexuality and vice versa? Do you feel as though your asexuality is entwined with your gender identity? Is your gender identity entwined with your asexuality? What is the relationship between your gender and your asexuality regarding perception and expression?

Health

How has access to healthcare and your asexuality intersected throughout your personal life? Do institutional services relating to health invalidate or validate your asexuality? Has the status of your health, mental and/or physical, been questioned because of your asexual identity? What implications has this had in your life? How have you had to navigate this relationship between your health and your asexuality?

Intersectionality

How do discussions of asexuality overlap with intersectionality? Do you think asexuality is forgotten or acknowledged in discussions of intersectionality? Does asexuality expand conversations of intersectionality? How does your asexuality relate to your embodiment of an intersection of identities? How does oppression factor into this understanding? What is the relationship between oppression and asexuality? How do asexual/ace people's experiences differ or relate based on how they embody various identities?

Masculinity

According to a census of the ace community conducted by AVEN of over 10,000 ace people, only 13.3% of the ace community identify as a "man" or "male." Why? Are understandings of asexuality and masculinity in conflict with one another unlike femininity and asexaulity? What does it mean societally to identify as a man/masc and asexual? What is your experience as an asexual man or masc ace person? Does asexuality challenge masculinity?

Nature

Being sexual, having a sexual drive, and experiencing sexual desire/attraction, has been viewed as being "natural." Does asexuality challenge these understandings? Is asexuality perceived as "unnatural"? Does asexuality challenge what it means to be human regarding ideas of "human nature"? How is asexuality connected to nature? What does nature mean to you as an ace person? How have asexual people been compared to asexuality in nature? 

Pride

Expressing pride is a form of empowerment for many ace people. How do you as an ace person express pride in your asexuality? Is ace/asexual pride important to you? How has asexuality been excluded or included from queer pride and should it be excluded or included? Do you use symbols such as the ace flag to express ace pride? Are symbols such as the ace flag important to you in expressing pride? 

Privilege

Self-identifying as asexual is only accessible to those who have access to the term. Is privilege entwined with having access to the asexual identity? How is identifying as asexual a privilege? Do you feel that the ace community is inherently exclusionary to certain voices? Does the ace community privilege certain voices over others? What is your relationship to privilege as an ace person?

Race

According to a census of the ace community conducted by AVEN of over 10,000 ace people, a massive 77.3% of the ace community in the survey identified as "White (NonHispanic)." Asexual communities are highly dominated by white people and white voices. How does this impact understandings and perceptions of asexuality? How does the relationship between whiteness and asexuality impact understandings of your own asexuality as an ace person? What is your experience as an ace person of color? How does race intersect with asexuality? How can the centrality of whiteness in the ace community be dismantled?

Representation

How do you see asexuality represented around you regarding portrayals in media? How has ace representation allowed you to embrace or accept your ace identity? What is the importance of representation of ace experiences? Do you see yourself represented in media? How has ace representation been harmful and/or helpful? How have you contributed to improving ace representation in media? Do you create ace/asexual representation through your art or writing?

Sex

What does sex mean to you as an ace/asexual person? Do you engage in sex? How do you navigate understandings of asexuality as being synonymous with being "nonsexual" as an ace/asexual person who engages in sex? Are you sex-averse, sex-repulsed sex-positive, sex-neutral, etc.? What are your thoughts on sex, if any at all? How does reproduction factor into discussions of sex and asexuality? How has sex functioned in your life (negatively or positively)?


Vote for every theme that appeals to you in the following voting form: 

Name *
Name
Votes *
Choose every theme that appeals to you. The eight themes with the most votes during this process will be moved to the second round of voting on Twitter.
This is not required, but if you would like to introduce a theme for consideration in the next round of voting, please feel free to do so here. Try to make sure the theme does not closely overlap any other already proposed theme (although some overlap is expected and totally acceptable). Try to make sure the theme is expressed in one word (two words maximum). Be sure to include a short description similar to the above proposed themes with your theme idea.

Past themes:

Body (Vol. 1, Issue 3)

While "body" may appear to refer most directly to the human body, the term can also be interpreted and applied more broadly and abstractly, incorporating other types of bodies and bodily forms. Some potential themes of written and visual work to submit include discussing, analyzing, or questioning how your own asexual/ace body is perceived by yourself and others, how issues of body-image and/or fatness intersect with asexuality, as well as how, in a general sense, asexual/ace bodies are perceived societally. More abstract themes may grapple with asexual bodies in nature, universal ideas of purpose and asexual bodies, as well as conceptions of reproduction and asexuality.


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Michael Paramo is an asexual Latinx demiguy located in southern California. They are currently a graduate student who has been selected to present their research at national conferences, such as by the International Association for the Study of Popular Music's U.S. branch, the Popular Culture Association, as well as the National Women's Studies Association. They are the founder of The Asexual and the Editor-in-Chief of The Asexual journal. Twitter: @Michael_Paramo

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What has The Asexual meant to you in 2017?

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What has The Asexual meant to you in 2017?

As the one year anniversary of The Asexual's inception approaches, this space for ace creators welcomes feedback on the ways in which The Asexual has impacted you this past year. Has reading other ace writers' work featured in The Asexual journal inspired you or moved you in a special way? Has being a part of a community of ace writers/artists and/or readers of The Asexual been important to you? Do you think The Asexual is doing important work or is important in your life to you as an ace person? Fill out the short form below to send this message to The Asexual and to share what this space has meant to you this past year. Your response may be used in a future article or on social media with your permission, so please be sure to provide an email address to receive a potential response. Thank you so much!

Name *
Name
Do you identify under the ace umbrella? *

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Vol. 1, Issue 3: On the Intersections of "Body" and Asexuality

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Vol. 1, Issue 3: On the Intersections of "Body" and Asexuality

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The Asexual is accepting submissions from asexual/ace writers and artists for the journal's third issue on the intersections of "body" and asexuality. While "body" may appear to refer most directly to the human body, the term can also be interpreted and applied more broadly and abstractly, incorporating other types of bodies and bodily forms. Some potential themes of written and visual work to submit include discussing, analyzing, or questioning how your own asexual/ace body is perceived by yourself and others, how issues of body-image and/or fatness intersect with asexuality, as well as how, in a general sense, asexual/ace bodies are perceived societally. More abstract themes may grapple with asexual bodies in nature, universal ideas of purpose and asexual bodies, as well as conceptions of reproduction and asexuality.

Submissions should be entirely original work and, preferably, previously unpublished, although this can be negotiated. There is no minimum length requirement, but please attempt to keep submissions of written work under fifty lines for poetry and under 3,000 words for prose. If you would like to send in a longer piece, this will likely be acceptable, but please send an email to AsexualJournal@gmail.com prior to submission to confirm. Along with your submission, please send a 50-100 word bio about yourself written in third person. Please send submissions in a Microsoft Word document or in PDF format. If accepted for publication in The Asexual, your piece may be edited with your approval prior to being published online as well as in physical format and be made available for purchase. While the owner retains copyright of work upon publication, they agree to give The Asexual first serial/electronic and print rights, and electronic and print archival rights. If the work is published subsequently, online or in print, credit to The Asexual should also be provided.

Deadline: September 15th, 2017 // Submit to: AsexualJournal@gmail.com

For full guidelines on submissions, visit The Asexual's submissions page.

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